Category Archives: Recipes

Majani Tea Brined Pork Loin

Serve with roasted garlic sweet potatoes and a green salad.

 

1 Pork Loin

 

Majani Tea Brine

 

8 cups water

1 cup coarse kosher salt

1/2 cup brown sugar

4 cinnamon sticks

1/3 cup star anise or 1/8 cup anise seed

2 T whole Allspice

4 Bay leaves

Zest from 1/4 orange

 

.5 cups tea leaves, note, measurement is for full leaf Majani orthodox, if using CTC or fannings, reduce to .25 cup or less

10 cups water to steep tea

 

If Roasting:

1/2 cup mustard

3 garlic cloves

fresh ground pepper, 10 turns

 

If Smoking:

1 cup raw white rice

2 cinnamon sticks

zest from  1/4 orange

cracked black pepper corns

1/2 cup brown sugar

 

Heat 8 cups water with salt, sugar and spices.  Bring to boil and turn off.  Let cool.  Add zest.  Bring 10 cups water to boil and steep the 1 cup of tea leaves for 5 minutes.  Strain, putting the tea leaves aside if you will be smoking with them later.  Cool.  Combine.

 

When mixture is room temperature, pour over pork loin.  If brining a full loin you may need to cut it in half if you don’t have a container where you can fully submerge the pork in the brine.  Refrigerate, keeping pork submerged for 24 to 36 hours.  Remove from brine and rinse.

 

When ready to cook, consider roasting or smoking.

 

To Roast:  preheat oven to 450 degrees.  Combine mustard, finely chopped garlic and pepper.  Score the side of the pork loin that has a covering of fat.  Rub with mustard mixture.  Place in shallow roasting pan.  Cook for 12 minutes in 450 degree oven.  Turn down to 350 and continue cooking until done, around 140 degrees.

 

To Smoke you may want to consider roasting the loin and finishing with a short smoke in a smoker, wok, or using the hotel pan method.  Alternatively, grilling with smoking with give a wonderful result.  Either way, combine the reserved cup of tea leaves with one cup of raw white rice, orange zest, cinnamon stick, cracked black pepper and sugar.  Place this mixture in the bottom of a heavily foil lined (multiple layers of foil) wok or hotel pan.  Turn heat up (under the hood) until the mixture begins to smoke.  Place in rack and pork.  Cover with foil and then wok lid or sheetpan.  If you are smoking without precooking, you will need to replace the smoking mixture after 15 minutes, so have additional mixture in the same proportions ready.  If you have roasted or grilled and are just finishing with the tea smoke, one 15 minute run should give you a very nice result.

 

 

Recipe by Cynthia Gold – Tea Sommelier at L’Espalier and Author of Culinary Tea: More than 150 Recipes Steeped in Tradition from around the World.

Spiced Orange And Majani Tea Roasted Pork Tenderloin Served With Mango, Peach And Habanera Salsa On A Bed Of Wilted Greens.

2 pork tenderloins, roughly one lb each, cleaned of excess fat and silver skin.

4 Tablespoons of  ‘Keyan Tea Spice Rub’

Orange juice, preferably fresh squeezed, roughly 2 cups

1 Roasting Pan, not aluminum or other reactive metal.  Glass or stainless steel will work well.

 

Preheat still oven to 375 degrees, convection oven to 325.

 

Rub the pork tenderloins with the ‘Majani Tea Spice Rub’ and let sit, well covered, in the refrigerator over night.  Remove from the refrigerator and place in a roasting pan, as small a pan as your tenderloins will fit in without crowding.  Pour orange juice (preferably fresh squeezed) in the pan to 1/3 of the way up the sides of the tenderloins.

Roast in preheated oven until desired doneness, preferably pink.  Baste often.  May be served hot or room temperature.

 

Chutney:

1 medium sized mango, still fairly firm

1 large or 2 medium sized peaches, still fairly firm

Brown sugar

1 medium red bell pepper

1 small habanera pepper, or less.  If unavailable replace with a teaspoon of red pepper flakes.

1 small red onion

2  limes

1/2 orange

1 Tablespoon freshly chopped herbs.

A blend of cilantro, basil and Italian parsley works well, but feel free to vary.

salt and pepper to taste

1/2 teaspoon of ‘Tea Spice Rub’

 

Peel and 1/4 inch dice 1 medium sized mango and 1 or 2 peaches.  You want them to be firm enough that you can cleanly dice them.  Wash, seed and dice the peppers.  Be sure to wear rubber gloves when you work with the habanera pepper and DO NOT RUB YOUR EYES.   Chop the habanera as small as you can, dice the red pepper to 1/4 inch dice.  Peel and dice the red pepper to about 1/8 inch dice.  Toss all together.  Squeeze in the juice of 2 limes and 1/2 orange.  Sprinkle in the tea spice rub, fresh herbs and additional salt and pepper to taste.  Stir well.  Adjust by taste.  Chill until ready to serve.

 

Recipe by Cynthia Gold – Tea Sommelier at L’Espalier and Author of Culinary Tea: More than 150 Recipes Steeped in Tradition from around the World.

11 Spice Majani Tea Rub

This is a versatile combination that is handy to keep available in your cabinet.  It is very nice rubbed on chicken, pork, beef and game for grilling or roasting.   It can also be used as a spice blend added to braising liquids, chutneys, you name it.

 

5 T finely ground Majani black tea

1/4 Cup Brown Sugar

2 t ground cinnamon

1 t curry powder

1 t ground cumin

1 t crushed red pepper flakes or crushed Szechwan peppercorns

1/2 t cayenne pepper

1 t freshly ground black pepper

1/2 t ground star anise or anise seed

1/2 t ground clove

1/2 t crushed fennel seed

1/2 t ground ginger

1/2 t ground mace

 

 

Combine all ingredients, mix well until homogeneous.  Store in tightly sealed jar or tin at room temperature.

 

Recipe by Cynthia Gold – Tea Sommelier at L’Espalier and Author of Culinary Tea: More than 150 Recipes Steeped in Tradition from around the World.

Seared Majani Tea Rubbed Tuna

Combine in spice grinder:

 

6 T Majani full leaf tea or 3T CTC or fannings

1 T Chinese 5 Spice Powder

1/2 t coriander seeds

1/2 t black peppercorns

1/2 t kosher salt

1 T brown sugar

 

Cut tuna into strips such that when sliced thinly on a diagonal the resulting slice will be the desired portion size for presentation.

Oil tuna lightly and dip in rub.  Set aside to form a crust.  Sear quickly on each side leaving rare in the center.

 

Serve with a ginger/soy dipping sauce.

 

Recipe by Cynthia Gold – Tea Sommelier at L’Espalier and Author of Culinary Tea: More than 150 Recipes Steeped in Tradition from around the World.

Bacon, Sage And Majani Tea Savory Scone

20 cups AP Flour

1 cup baking powder

1/4 cup coarsely ground Majani tea

5 teaspoons salt

2 teaspoons sugar

 

25 oz butter

60 oz buttermilk

 

crumbled cooked bacon or chopped ham

chopped sage or scallions (if using scallions, switch to a milder tea)

cracked pepper

 

With paddle attachment, combine flour, baking powder, salt, sugar, tea and cracked black pepper on low.  Gradually add cubed butter until crumbly, about the size of peas.

 

Add crumbled bacon and sage (or scallions) and most of the buttermilk just barely mixing to incorporate.  Add remaining buttermilk if dry.  Be careful not to overwork,  Form and chill or freeze.

 

Back thawed at 375 low fan until baked through

 

Recipe by Cynthia Gold – Tea Sommelier at L’Espalier and Author of Culinary Tea: More than 150 Recipes Steeped in Tradition from around the World.

Balsamic And Majani Tea Caramelized Onions

3          medium onions, thinly sliced may be red, white or a blend

2          tablespoons olive oil

1/4       cup Brown sugar

1          tablespoon full bodied black Kenyan tea leaves

1          tablespoon balsamic vinegar

 

Steep 1 tablespoon of full bodied black tea in ¾ cup of boiling water for 5 minutes.  Strain and set aside.  Thinly slice red and white onions.  Cook over low heat in a small amount of oil until soft.  Turn heat up to medium high and sprinkle in brown sugar.  Cook until begins to color.  Optionally add a touch of ginger or 5-spice powder.  Add large splash of balsamic vinegar and the prepared 3x strength black tea and continue on medium a few minutes more, stirring constantly.  Season with salt to taste.

 

Recipe by Cynthia Gold – Tea Sommelier at L’Espalier and Author of Culinary Tea: More than 150 Recipes Steeped in Tradition from around the World.

White Port Infused With Majani Black Tea Rose Petals And Lavender

Majani Teas is glad to share another great drink recipe from Tea Sommelier, Cynthia Gold.

 YIELD: 750 ML OR 1 BOTTLE

 1 bottle of White Port, Dow’s Fine White Porto works very nicely

1/4 cup Kenyan full leaf orthodox black tea (or 1/8 cup ctc or fannings)

1/2 cup loosely packed fresh rose petals or 1/4 cup dried rose petals

2 Tablespoons fresh Lavender Petals or 1 Tablespoon dried lavender petals

Place all ingredients together in a glass or stainless steel pitcher.  Steep at room temperature to taste.  You will probably be very happy with the results at around 45 minutes, but start tasting it a little earlier.  The larger leaf the tea you use, the longer it will take to infuse.  Strain very well.  The key to making shelf stable Tea Cocktails is the straining.  Use a coffee filter, T-Sac or several layers of cheese cloth to strain the port completely.  If you leave any tea residue, the port will over-steep.  If you leave any flower petals, they can break down and turn your beautiful clear cocktail cloudy.  When properly strained, this port can stay at room temperature for up to 3 months.

Serve as is or use to drizzle over fresh fruit.

Recipe by Cynthia Gold – Tea Sommelier at L’Espalier and Author of Culinary Tea: More than 150 Recipes Steeped in Tradition from around the World.

Majani Tea Champagne Cocktail Recipe

The combinations are endless and ever so refreshing.  Try out the recipe described below, then make your own variations.  These syrups and their variations are also very nice added to iced teas, juices or drizzled over fresh fruit.  The cocktail shown below was served as part of our Mother’s Day Champagne Tea Brunch at the L’Espalier this year.

Place 1 teaspoon fruit puree and 1 to 2 tablespoons of tea syrup into a champagne flute.  Fill with champagne.  Optionally stir.

KENYAN BLACKBERRY CHAMPAGNE COCKTAIL

Tea Syrup

1 1/2 cups sugar

2 cups water

1 cinnamon stick

2 heaped tablespoons Majani black tea leaves

Place 1 1/2 cups of sugar and 2 cups of water into a small saucepan.  Add cinnamon stick.  Bring to a boil, stir, then turn down to a simmer until a light syrup is formed.   

Add 2 heaped tablespoons of Majani loose leaf  tea. Stir and let sit until cooled.  Then strain well.  Let cool.  Use as is or with a teaspoon of Blackberry  or other fruit puree.

Recipe by Cynthia Gold – Tea Sommelier at L’Espalier and Author of Culinary Tea: More than 150 Recipes Steeped in Tradition from around the World.